I highly commend the web page 'Nine top tips for Media students'. From the people behind theory.org.uk, its worth a read!

Monday, 13 June 2016

Summer tasks

To commence the A2 we resume lessons to explore the conventions of the music video format, and over the summer you research the topic of the music industry.

If you wish to engage in some independent reading over the holidays, then see this post for suggestions - but of course my 3 main blogs for the A2 would be useful! The book Money For Nothing is especially recommended as light reading that links into industry, audience and audience, and should help you with some ideas too (especially if you look up some of the videos or directors discussed in it).


ALL my blogs are listed here, with links for YouTube coursework playlists by year in this post. Student blogs here.


By the final lesson in June you should have launched your new blog, making the setting changes; published 3 initial posts; blogged on 5+ music videos including at least 1 in high detail; edited and posted a vodcast on general music video conventions.
Over the summer you should complete any of this not already done, and do the industry research task outlined below - ready to edit your 2nd A2 vodcast during the 1st full week back in September.


SET UP NEW BLOG:
Follow instructions here. Note one change: use the 'simple' template. NOT picture window. There are lots of minor changes to follow through, so read the post carefully.

Sunday, 12 June 2016

Useful reading, viewing and links

DVD sets of autuer's work are useful
Using Amazon.co.uk links, here are some suggestions for books, DVDs, sites/blogs and playlists that will help with your A2 Media work.

MY/STUDENT BLOGS + PLAYLISTS

  • MusiVidz is the main one, linking coursework and exam
  • MediaReg for the regulation exam topic we start after Xmas
  • ProdEval for tie-in material with the 1st half of the exam (though more is linked into MusiVidz posts)
  • Past student blogs - as the OCR (UK) is what CIE based their syllabus on, the Ilkley examples remain useful
  • Playlists - I've directly linked these in this post, or you can just browse the YouTube channel (and you can search for others beyond IGS/StG yourself).



MUSIC VIDEO DIRECTORS DVDs
Producer PalmPictures.com's website. A google.
Just 4 of the many video directors who have developed a distinctive individual style, leading some to label them as auteurs. The latter 3 have all directed successful feature films too - its a common route into the film business (remember that both Warp and WT emerged from music video producers deciding to take it a step on). You can find DVD sets with great extras compiling some of their work.

You will find I namecheck Corbijn especially often - there are also collections of U2 and particularly Depeche Mode music videos that he has (mostly!) directed. Depeche Mode and the Pixies' work is especially recommended if you're after inspiration to try something a little strange or different.

Recording an hour or so of music videos on any channel and making brief notes as you then watch multiple videos is another great way to quickly build up a wider range of specific examples - you may have nothing to note on some, and only 1 or 2 points on some, but the wider your range of references the better your own work will be - and the easier you will find both the Evaluation and first half of the exam.


MUSIC VIDEO COURSEWORK (+ EXAM)

Keith Negus' Popular Music in Theory: incredibly useful for both coursework and exam, this gives you a summary of media theories applied to music. Great for the Evaluation, but also blogging about audience; brilliant for both Q1 and Q1b of the exam. It is quite old, but still useful.

Not particularly academic but very useful for the history of music vids, + refs/analysis to/of many vids and directors you won't have heard of (but which could give you ideas), is Austerlitz' Money For Nothing: A History of the Music Video From The Beatles to The White Stripes. You can of course try a general music video (book) search, and you'll come up the likes of this. Austerlitz provides a history of the music video and how it developed over time, and mentions (details) lots of examples you won't have come across - but which might help for ideas. Such examples may also end up being used in your exam too.